Thomas Jefferson UniversityScott Memorial Library

   Where's JEFFLINE? (update)

   Information for...

   Campus Links:
     Center for
        Teaching & Learning

     University Archives
     Blackboard
     Find People
     JeffMail
     RAP


Scott Memorial Library
1020 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA 19107
215-503-6994
AskaLibrarian@jefferson.edu


CTL Training Sessions

CTL offers live and on-demand training sessions open to all Jefferson faculty, staff and students, in educational technology, information searching skills, and other teaching & learning areas.

Jump to: Blackboard Learn Training | Academic Research and Library Tools | Instructional Technology | Teaching & Learning | Writing for Publication | Online Tutorials


BLACKBOARD LEARN TRAINING:

We offer workshops to get you started with Blackboard Learn, the course management system used at Jefferson.

Register for Blackboard Learn workshops.


ACADEMIC RESEARCH AND LIBRARY TOOLS:

If you would like to request an Academic Research and Library Tools training session, please contact Dan Kipnis at 215-503-2825 or Dan.Kipnis@jefferson.edu.


Bibliographic Management: Introduction to Mendeley
Mendeley is an online bibliographic management tool that allows users to manage references, read and annotate PDFs, collaborate in groups and network with researchers from all over the world. With over 390 million user documents, over 2 million members and 225,000 research groups the Mendeley tool will continue to grow with their recent purchase by Elsevier.

Schedule It

By Request Only


Bibliographic Management: Introduction to RefWorks
Stop typing your bibliographies. Sign-up for this workshop to acquaint yourself with how to use RefWorks for the first time. More than 6,400 Jeffersonians use RefWorks, a web-based database and bibliography creation program, available from Scott Library. Learn to create, organize, and access personal databases of bibliographic citations. Save time and let RefWorks format your bibliography for you. We'll show you how to use Refworks to import, export, search, and format citations, and use RefShare to collaborate and share databases with your colleagues.

Schedule It

By Request Only


Conducting Research with Knowledge-Based Databases, Search Engines and Managing Your Citations with RefWorks 2.0
This 3-hour workshop will cover PubMed, Scopus, Google and Google Scholar and how to use RefWorks 2.0 to manage your citations for publication. This workshop is designed for all Jefferson researchers. We’ll move from introductory concepts to more advanced search techniques. If you need to organize citations and aim to expedite your research output this workshop will help.

Schedule It

By Request Only


e-books at Jefferson
Learn about trends in scholarly publishing, how to use the growing collection of e-books available from Scott Library and how to integrate e-books into Blackboard Learn.

Schedule It

By Request Only


Finding Health Information for Your Patients
Patients are armed with a plethora of medical information from the Internet. This consultation will guide you to trusted websites for your patients.

This session can be catered to specific departments.

Schedule It

By Request Only


Finding Quality Images
The Scott Memorial Library offers many databases that offer images for presentations. Among the collections that will be examined: UpToDate, AccessMedicine, PHDIL, Jefferson Clinical Image Database and open access resources from the National Library of Medicine. Stop wasting time searching Google images and use the many high quality online resources offered by the Scott Memorial Library.

Schedule It

By Request Only


Getting Started: Identifying Funding Opportunities with Jefferson Resources
Wondering how to fund your next project? Numerous opportunities are offered by non-federal funding organizations, such as disease-specific associations and foundations, to get your concept off the ground.

After this course, researchers will understand:

  • Steps from ‘Concept through Submission’
  • How to make use of funding databases such as Pivot and the Jefferson Research website to identify appropriate opportunities
  • Access relevant services of the Office of Institutional Advancement, Center for Teaching & Learning, Research Administrative Center of Excellence, and the Office of Research Administration


Grants Information
The Scott Memorial Library Grants Information Service helps faculty to identify research funding opportunities. Develop a strategy to find grants and funding opportunities using tools and services such as Pivot, NIH Guide, and the Jefferson Foundation.

Schedule It

By Request Only


High Impact Publishing
Academic publishing is undergoing a dramatic shift as journals become more specialized and the number of publishing outlets surge. Understanding the publishing world and its potential impact on one’s career can be confusing and mysterious. This workshop provides an introduction to academic publishing by exploring the metrics and tools used to determine “impact.” Facilitators will explore the concept of “high impact” publishing, discuss two tools for assessing a journals impact factor, and discuss the evolution of academic publishing, including predatory publishing practices and open access journals.

Upon completion of the session, participants will be able to:

  • Discuss some of the metrics used for determining impact factor
  • Describe at least one tool for determining a journal’s impact factor
  • Identify future trends in academic publishing


Introduction to Google Forms
Are you trying to gather feedback from users and want to use email to gather responses? This workshop will introduce Google forms for creating quick and easy online surveys and questionnaires. Build surveys using multiple-choice, text, checkboxes, lists or scales. You will create a form and view how results are displayed. Google forms is part of google docs, the free web-based program that also includes word processing, spreadsheets and presentation templates. This workshop will focus on forms.

Schedule It

By Request Only


Introduction to OVIDSP
This workshop is designed for all Jeffersonians with little or no experience searching the new MEDLINE database using OVIDSP. This hands-on workshop will introduce participants to the MEDLINE database structure and content.

The workshop will cover the following topics:

  • How to access the database
  • Personal accounts and workspace
  • What is MeSH?
  • What is a Scope Note?
  • How does the Explode feature work in OVID?
  • Explode versus Focus
  • How to limit searches
  • How to save, print and email citations
  • Find Similar feature
  • Find Citing Articles feature
  • Find New Citation feature


Schedule It

By Request Only


Professional PubMed Searching
Learn to search MEDLINE through PubMed, the National Library of Medicine's Entrez search engine. This class focuses on using Linkout (links to over 5,300 full-text SML electronic journals), My NCBI (store and retrieve search strategies and establish search filters), Clipboard, Limit, and History features of PubMed. In addition, learn to set-up collection lists to permanently save lists of citations.

This workshop will cover:

  • Limits
  • Journal browser
  • MeSH browser
  • Single citation matcher
  • Truncation
  • Search field tags
  • Journals Databases
  • PreMEDLINE
  • Natural language searching
  • Clinical Queries using research methodology filters
  • Creating search filters


Schedule It

By Request Only


RSS Workshop - Manage your information intake
Are you overwhelmed by the task of keeping up to date? Work smarter and be more productive by using RSS, a Web standard, to consolidate journal table of contents alerts, news headlines, Septa outages and more in one place. In this workshop Jeffersonians will create and customize their own Newsblur account.

Schedule It

By Request Only


Survey Research Workshop
Survey fatigue is a threat to survey validity. To alleviate this issue, the Office of Institutional Research has implemented a survey policy for TJU. This workshop will teach the attendees how to submit student survey proposals and create valid surveys. We will discuss question bias: how word choice can influence respondents’ answers. We will identify bias and develop ways to avoid using bias in survey questions. Additionally, we will discuss how to determine which type of question format is most applicable for the information needed. Finally, participants will learn some basic features of Survey Monkey to create professional-looking surveys.

Participants of this workshop will be able to:

  • Submit a survey for OIR approval
  • Identify bias and rewrite questions to eliminate bias
  • Choose appropriate questions to acquire the needed information
  • Create a survey in SurveyMonkey


Systematic Reviews
Are you thinking about creating a systematic review? Librarians at Scott Library, along with Ben Leiby, Director for the Division of Biostatistics with the Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, will inform you about the process.

After this 60-minute session participants will be able to:

  • distinguish between review types to inform a decision in initiating a systematic review
  • utilize standards such as PRISMA to create a rigorous and publication-worthy systematic review
  • plan for appropriate statistical analysis in a systematic review or meta-analysis


Take Advantage of the Jefferson Digital Commons for Shameless Self-Promotion
It's a win-win academic opportunity--promote your Jefferson research and publishing efforts to the world by participating in the Jefferson Digital Commons (JDC). The JDC increases your visibility. With over 7,700 different archived full-text resources including academic articles, posters, preprints, videos, images, teaching materials and newsletters you get permanent public space for all types of files AND your work is indexed by search engines like Google. Receive monthly alerts notifying you how many times your works have been downloaded. Create a faculty researcher page. Use the JDC as a university press and publish your department newsletters or create a new journal. Learn how the JDC complements Xythos and the Faculty Interests Database. The JDC is free to all Jeffersonians.

Schedule It

By Request Only


Twitter for Beginners
Politicians, celebrities, educators and organizations are tweeting. Join us to learn about Twitter. You will create an account, learn to tweet, Twitter etiquette, and how tweeting can help strengthen your course, organization, or department community. Follow [Scott Memorial Library]

Schedule It

By Request Only


Using Scopus & Internet Search Engines Effectively
Tired of getting millions of results when you search Google? Novice users enter their search topic into the default search engine of choice (usually Google). But, did you know that you can significantly increase the chances you'll find what you're looking for by knowing some of tricks of the searching trade? Your librarians will show you how to change your simple searches to successful power searches. This workshop will also discuss Google Scholar and citation analysis.

Schedule It

By Request Only

INSTRUCTIONAL TECHNOLOGY:

    ExamSoft Basics
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 9/8/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: JAH M-13A
    (Register for this workshop)

    ExamSoft is a web-based solution that supports the entire testing process including exam creation, administration, secure delivery, scoring, and analysis. This workshop focuses on the mechanics of creating and posting exams. It is essential for anyone using the product including Administrative Assistants, Faculty and Course Coordinators.

    Topics include:
    • Navigating the interface
    • Adding/Importing questions
    • Creating and posting exams

    Improving Assessment with ExamSoft
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 9/22/2016
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this workshop)

    ExamSoft is not just a secure delivery solution—it has the potential to improve teaching and learning exponentially! This workshop, which focuses on the feedback and analysis features of ExamSoft, is essential for item writers, course faculty, and administration.

    Topics include:
    • Student Feedback reports
    • Self-directed learning
    • Early advising/remediation
    • Item analysis
    • Curricular goals and objectives


    Introducing iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience) to Your Course
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 9/26/2016
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this workshop)

    iCE (interactive Curricula Experience) is a web-based platform and iPad app which delivers faculty-generated content directly to students’ iPads, laptops or desktops for a connected learning experience.

    Making use of shared resources, the iCE Builder allows faculty to package multiple learning Objects for direct distribution to students' devices. The iCE App's display helps students and faculty connect learning Objects to topics and Topics to Modules. These course building blocks (Objects, Topics and Modules), and the iCE search engine, also assist learners to make connections.

    This learning initiative makes collaboration and active learning much more accessible to the Jefferson community and may help inspire different approaches to teaching and learning across the university.

    Faculty wishing to learn more or to adopt this interactive technology for storing, sharing and organizing instructional content must attend one of the iCE workshops. The workshop introduces the iCE Builder interface and student app, so faculty may begin building a course in iCE.

    In this workshop participants will:
    • Develop content beginning with Objects (images, video or other course artifacts)
    • Organize Objects into Topics
    • Create Modules for courses using both self-developed content and shared content
    • Learn the steps to incorporate iCE into your course


    Mobile Presenting Tips & Tricks
    Instructors: Kathleen Day, MS; Sean Dyer
    Date: 10/6/2016
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Scott 306
    (Register for this workshop)

    Sharing images, video and other content on the fly is becoming easier and easier to do with consumer tools, and select campus classrooms have been equipped with AppleTV to help this real-time sharing. This workshop will demonstrate various tools and techniques for sharing with a mobile or personal device in real time and introduce participants to more advanced tools that can be used for sharing screen recordings.

    Topics include:
    • AirDisplay
    • AirPlay (for projection)
    • Reflector (for Screen Recording)
    • QuickTime (for Screen Recording)


    Please note: Most of these tools are Apple OS based and may not be available on the Windows platform.

    Nearpod Audience Response System
    Instructor: Edward Everett
    Date: 10/25/2016
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this workshop)

    Nearpod is the CTL’s audience response system that allows instructors to share content and assessments in real time with students using their personal and mobile devices. Push quizzes, polls, videos, web links, slide shows, and homework to your students easily in a manner and appealing multi-media platform that keeps students engaged and active.

    Participants will learn how to:
    • Create a Nearpod slideshow
    • Add activity slides such as Quizzes/Polls
    • Collect and analyze Nearpod data
    • Deploy a Nearpod for synchronous (live) or asynchronous (homework) sessions


    Building Interactives in iCE: Advanced iCE Skills Workshop
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 11/14/2016
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this workshop)

    This is an advanced technological workshop on building interactive learning objects in iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience).

    Course developers can create two different types of interactive features in iCE.:Hotspots and Timelines. Hotspots allow learners to interact with a learning object and receive feedback in real time--think identifying anomalies on an EKG or identifying key structures in a brain scan. Timelines typically present information in a linear fashion such as the stages of fetal development or key moments in the development of occupational therapy as a profession. Timelines may also be used to describe a process such as the key steps in developing a public health message or pre-surgery routines. This workshop instructs learners on key questions and considerations to jumpstart interactive development for the iCE platform. Participants will be guided through the process for building Hotspots and Timelines in this experiential workshop.

    Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to:
    • Identify a potential Hotspot in the learner’s discipline
    • Identify a potential Timeline in the learner’s discipline
    • Describe two key differences between interactives and learning objects in iCE
    • Create an interactive for the iCE platform

    Workshop registration is limited to participants who have previously contributed learning modules the content management system.

    Introducing iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience) to Your Course
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 12/6/2016
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this workshop)

    iCE (interactive Curricula Experience) is a web-based platform and iPad app which delivers faculty-generated content directly to students’ iPads, laptops or desktops for a connected learning experience.

    Making use of shared resources, the iCE Builder allows faculty to package multiple learning Objects for direct distribution to students' devices. The iCE App's display helps students and faculty connect learning Objects to topics and Topics to Modules. These course building blocks (Objects, Topics and Modules), and the iCE search engine, also assist learners to make connections.

    This learning initiative makes collaboration and active learning much more accessible to the Jefferson community and may help inspire different approaches to teaching and learning across the university.

    Faculty wishing to learn more or to adopt this interactive technology for storing, sharing and organizing instructional content must attend one of the iCE workshops. The workshop introduces the iCE Builder interface and student app, so faculty may begin building a course in iCE.

    In this workshop participants will:
    • Develop content beginning with Objects (images, video or other course artifacts)
    • Organize Objects into Topics
    • Create Modules for courses using both self-developed content and shared content
    • Learn the steps to incorporate iCE into your course


    Teaching with iCE: Too Cool for School
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 12/16/2016
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    The iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience) Platform & App, a locally-developed content management system, literally places the learning experience at the student’s fingertips. The platform encourages course developers to re-think the organization and presentation of learning materials based on how they wish the learner to engage with the course content. During the session, a sample module with related topics will be deconstructed for participants. Content developers will describe the organization of at least one topic from two perspectives—the pedagogical and the visual. Templates used to create individual topics will be shared with participants to make the design process transparent. The facilitator will describe best practices in course design and development throughout the workshop, including the importance of a consistency in creating and delivering content, the benefits of multiple kinds of learning objects, and the ability for learners to interact with course materials.

    Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
    • Describe three course design principles
    • Identify key characteristics of the iCE platform
    • Apply the iCE template to a topic

    ExamSoft Basics
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 1/11/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this workshop)

    ExamSoft is a web-based solution that supports the entire testing process including exam creation, administration, secure delivery, scoring, and analysis. This workshop focuses on the mechanics of creating and posting exams. It is essential for anyone using the product including Administrative Assistants, Faculty and Course Coordinators.

    Topics include:
    • Navigating the interface
    • Adding/Importing questions
    • Creating and posting exams

    Improving Assessment with ExamSoft
    Instructor: Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 1/25/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this workshop)

    ExamSoft is not just a secure delivery solution—it has the potential to improve teaching and learning exponentially! This workshop, which focuses on the feedback and analysis features of ExamSoft, is essential for item writers, course faculty, and administration.

    Topics include:
    • Student Feedback reports
    • Self-directed learning
    • Early advising/remediation
    • Item analysis
    • Curricular goals and objectives


    Mobile Presenting Tips & Tricks
    Instructors: Kathleen Day, MS; Sean Dyer
    Date: 2/15/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:00pm
    Location: Scott 306
    (Register for this workshop)

    Sharing images, video and other content on the fly is becoming easier and easier to do with consumer tools, and select campus classrooms have been equipped with AppleTV to help this real-time sharing. This workshop will demonstrate various tools and techniques for sharing with a mobile or personal device in real time and introduce participants to more advanced tools that can be used for sharing screen recordings.

    Topics include:
    • AirDisplay
    • AirPlay (for projection)
    • Reflector (for Screen Recording)
    • QuickTime (for Screen Recording)


    Please note: Most of these tools are Apple OS based and may not be available on the Windows platform.

    Introducing iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience) to Your Course
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 2/23/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this workshop)

    iCE (interactive Curricula Experience) is a web-based platform and iPad app which delivers faculty-generated content directly to students’ iPads, laptops or desktops for a connected learning experience.

    Making use of shared resources, the iCE Builder allows faculty to package multiple learning Objects for direct distribution to students' devices. The iCE App's display helps students and faculty connect learning Objects to topics and Topics to Modules. These course building blocks (Objects, Topics and Modules), and the iCE search engine, also assist learners to make connections.

    This learning initiative makes collaboration and active learning much more accessible to the Jefferson community and may help inspire different approaches to teaching and learning across the university.

    Faculty wishing to learn more or to adopt this interactive technology for storing, sharing and organizing instructional content must attend one of the iCE workshops. The workshop introduces the iCE Builder interface and student app, so faculty may begin building a course in iCE.

    In this workshop participants will:
    • Develop content beginning with Objects (images, video or other course artifacts)
    • Organize Objects into Topics
    • Create Modules for courses using both self-developed content and shared content
    • Learn the steps to incorporate iCE into your course


    Building Interactives in iCE: Advanced iCE Skills Workshop
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 3/3/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this workshop)

    This is an advanced technological workshop on building interactive learning objects in iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience).

    Course developers can create two different types of interactive features in iCE.:Hotspots and Timelines. Hotspots allow learners to interact with a learning object and receive feedback in real time--think identifying anomalies on an EKG or identifying key structures in a brain scan. Timelines typically present information in a linear fashion such as the stages of fetal development or key moments in the development of occupational therapy as a profession. Timelines may also be used to describe a process such as the key steps in developing a public health message or pre-surgery routines. This workshop instructs learners on key questions and considerations to jumpstart interactive development for the iCE platform. Participants will be guided through the process for building Hotspots and Timelines in this experiential workshop.

    Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to:
    • Identify a potential Hotspot in the learner’s discipline
    • Identify a potential Timeline in the learner’s discipline
    • Describe two key differences between interactives and learning objects in iCE
    • Create an interactive for the iCE platform

    Workshop registration is limited to participants who have previously contributed learning modules the content management system.

    Nearpod Audience Response System
    Instructor: Brittany Clark, MS
    Date: 4/14/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this workshop)

    Nearpod is the CTL’s audience response system that allows instructors to share content and assessments in real time with students using their personal and mobile devices. Push quizzes, polls, videos, web links, slide shows, and homework to your students easily in a manner and appealing multi-media platform that keeps students engaged and active.

    Participants will learn how to:
    • Create a Nearpod slideshow
    • Add activity slides such as Quizzes/Polls
    • Collect and analyze Nearpod data
    • Deploy a Nearpod for synchronous (live) or asynchronous (homework) sessions


    Introducing iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience) to Your Course
    Instructor: (TBD) CTL Staff
    Date: 4/18/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this workshop)

    iCE (interactive Curricula Experience) is a web-based platform and iPad app which delivers faculty-generated content directly to students’ iPads, laptops or desktops for a connected learning experience.

    Making use of shared resources, the iCE Builder allows faculty to package multiple learning Objects for direct distribution to students' devices. The iCE App's display helps students and faculty connect learning Objects to topics and Topics to Modules. These course building blocks (Objects, Topics and Modules), and the iCE search engine, also assist learners to make connections.

    This learning initiative makes collaboration and active learning much more accessible to the Jefferson community and may help inspire different approaches to teaching and learning across the university.

    Faculty wishing to learn more or to adopt this interactive technology for storing, sharing and organizing instructional content must attend one of the iCE workshops. The workshop introduces the iCE Builder interface and student app, so faculty may begin building a course in iCE.

    In this workshop participants will:
    • Develop content beginning with Objects (images, video or other course artifacts)
    • Organize Objects into Topics
    • Create Modules for courses using both self-developed content and shared content
    • Learn the steps to incorporate iCE into your course



If you would like to request a Instructional Technology training session, please contact Kathy Day at 215-503-4991 or Kathleen.Day@jefferson.edu.


Adobe Acrobat Basics
Use Adobe Acrobat to create interactive teaching materials by assembling PowerPoint presentations, existing PDFs, web pages, photos and illustrations into a single Acrobat file.

Topics include:

  • converting to PDF
  • editing PDFs
  • adding interactivity including bookmarks, links, buttons and media clips


Schedule It


Adobe Acrobat: Forms
Need an evaluation tool or a registration form? Learn to convert your MS Word document into a digital form that can be emailed or posted on the web.

In this workshop you will:

  • complete a form in MS Word
  • convert the form to an Adobe acrobat file
  • insert text fields, check boxes, radio buttons, select menus, list boxes
  • save and distribute the form
  • compile completed forms


Schedule It


Adobe Captivate
Captivate's import features allow you to capture your PPT slides and add audio to prepare a fully-narrated lecture that can be posted to Blackboard.

The instructor will demonstrate how to:

  • prepare your PPT slides for import into Captivate
  • import a PPT presentation
  • add and edit narration
  • publish your presentation for both the web (SWF) or as an MP3 file
Note: If you already own a copy of Captivate, bring your laptop for a hands-on experience.

Schedule It


Building Interactives in iCE: Advanced iCE Skills Workshop
This is an advanced technological workshop on building interactive learning objects in iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience).

Course developers can create two different types of interactive features in iCE.:Hotspots and Timelines. Hotspots allow learners to interact with a learning object and receive feedback in real time--think identifying anomalies on an EKG or identifying key structures in a brain scan. Timelines typically present information in a linear fashion such as the stages of fetal development or key moments in the development of occupational therapy as a profession. Timelines may also be used to describe a process such as the key steps in developing a public health message or pre-surgery routines. This workshop instructs learners on key questions and considerations to jumpstart interactive development for the iCE platform. Participants will be guided through the process for building Hotspots and Timelines in this experiential workshop.

Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Identify a potential Hotspot in the learner’s discipline
  • Identify a potential Timeline in the learner’s discipline
  • Describe two key differences between interactives and learning objects in iCE
  • Create an interactive for the iCE platform

Workshop registration is limited to participants who have previously contributed learning modules the content management system.


ExamSoft Basics
ExamSoft is a web-based solution that supports the entire testing process including exam creation, administration, secure delivery, scoring, and analysis. This workshop focuses on the mechanics of creating and posting exams. It is essential for anyone using the product including Administrative Assistants, Faculty and Course Coordinators.

Topics include:

  • Navigating the interface
  • Adding/Importing questions
  • Creating and posting exams


How to Integrate Self-Regulated Learning into Your Courses (Webinar)
After participating in How to Integrate Self-Regulated Learning into Your Courses, you will know exactly what self-regulated learning is as well as the stages of the learning process it addresses. You will also be able to:

  • Select, adapt, and design activities and assignments that will enhance your students’ self-regulated learning skills
  • Incorporate these activities and assignments into appropriate course components such as readings, written assignments, and exams
  • Explain how and why these activities and assignments increase student learning, strengthen students’ problem-solving skills, improve students’ exam performance, enhance the quality of student work, and reduce student overconfidence

Instructor: Linda B. Nilson, Ph.D. Director, Office of Teaching Effectiveness and Innovation, Clemson University


Improving Assessment with ExamSoft
ExamSoft is not just a secure delivery solution—it has the potential to improve teaching and learning exponentially! This workshop, which focuses on the feedback and analysis features of ExamSoft, is essential for item writers, course faculty, and administration.

Topics include:

  • Student Feedback reports
  • Self-directed learning
  • Early advising/remediation
  • Item analysis
  • Curricular goals and objectives


Introducing iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience) to Your Course
iCE (interactive Curricula Experience) is a web-based platform and iPad app which delivers faculty-generated content directly to students’ iPads, laptops or desktops for a connected learning experience.

Making use of shared resources, the iCE Builder allows faculty to package multiple learning Objects for direct distribution to students' devices. The iCE App's display helps students and faculty connect learning Objects to topics and Topics to Modules. These course building blocks (Objects, Topics and Modules), and the iCE search engine, also assist learners to make connections.

This learning initiative makes collaboration and active learning much more accessible to the Jefferson community and may help inspire different approaches to teaching and learning across the university.

Faculty wishing to learn more or to adopt this interactive technology for storing, sharing and organizing instructional content must attend one of the iCE workshops. The workshop introduces the iCE Builder interface and student app, so faculty may begin building a course in iCE.

In this workshop participants will:

  • Develop content beginning with Objects (images, video or other course artifacts)
  • Organize Objects into Topics
  • Create Modules for courses using both self-developed content and shared content
  • Learn the steps to incorporate iCE into your course


Mobile Presenting Tips & Tricks
Sharing images, video and other content on the fly is becoming easier and easier to do with consumer tools, and select campus classrooms have been equipped with AppleTV to help this real-time sharing. This workshop will demonstrate various tools and techniques for sharing with a mobile or personal device in real time and introduce participants to more advanced tools that can be used for sharing screen recordings.

Topics include:

  • AirDisplay
  • AirPlay (for projection)
  • Reflector (for Screen Recording)
  • QuickTime (for Screen Recording)


Please note: Most of these tools are Apple OS based and may not be available on the Windows platform.


Nearpod Audience Response System
Nearpod is the CTL’s audience response system that allows instructors to share content and assessments in real time with students using their personal and mobile devices. Push quizzes, polls, videos, web links, slide shows, and homework to your students easily in a manner and appealing multi-media platform that keeps students engaged and active.

Participants will learn how to:

  • Create a Nearpod slideshow
  • Add activity slides such as Quizzes/Polls
  • Collect and analyze Nearpod data
  • Deploy a Nearpod for synchronous (live) or asynchronous (homework) sessions


Peer and Self Assessments
Peer assessment is a powerful way to engage students in the assessment process. It encourages students to learn from one another. It is particularly useful in small groups as it encourages students to think about their contribution to the group and gain deeper understanding of assessment criteria and learning outcomes. Students become better team players.

Workshop participants will be encouraged to share experiences, opinions and ideas about peer evaluation. This workshop is suitable for instructors who are new to peer assessment as well as those who are experienced with this form of assessment.

Topics Include:

  • Different ways to conduct self and peer assessment
  • Assessing self and peer assessment
  • Why and when conduct self and peer assessment
  • Self and peer assessment in small group settings
  • Rubrics (assessment criteria) for self and peer evaluation
  • LMS Software that supports self and peer assessment


Photoshop
Want to create a digital image collection for teaching and publishing? This hands-on workshop covers each step of the process - from digitizing images to managing files for all possible output types. We'll use Adobe Photoshop on the Windows operating system.

Schedule It


Prezi
Prezi is a popular cloud-based presentation software. This hands-on workshop teaches participants how to make engaging and effective presentations using Prezi. It will also inform participants about TJU’s privacy and confidentiality policy concerning the use of such cloud-based software. Session notes will be available. This workshop is suitable for both faculty and administrative staff.

Topics include:

  • Establishing a “student & teacher” account
  • Prezi privacy settings
  • Creating a presentation, including the following features:
    o Canvas, templates, paths and frames
    o Adding, deleting, moving frames
    o Adding, deleting and changing paths
  • Saving and sharing a Prezi online and in PDF
  • Collaborating with co-presenters in making Prezis (if there is time and interest)
  • Downloading a Prezi Presentation


Student Electronic Portfolios
Electronic Portfolios have gained prominence in higher education, more and more programs require students to put together a portfolio as partial fulfillment of criteria for graduation. Student portfolios have been used in program planning, student assessment, career planning, and accreditation processes. It is important to gain a better understanding of e-Portfolios; their uses, challenges and potentials.

Workshop participants will be encouraged to share experiences, opinions and ideas about the usefulness and value of student electronic portfolios. This workshop is suitable for people interested in e-Portfolios with or without experience in this area.

Topics include:

  • Why use student e-Portfolios - current state of the practice and future potential)
  • Different types of e-Portfolios - student, teaching and institutional
  • Integrating student e-Portfolios in the curriculum - artifacts and reflections
  • E-Portfolio templates – artifacts list and reflections
  • E-Portfolio software
  • Implementing e-Portfolios and challenges
  • Long term sustainability of e-Portfolio adoption


Survey Research
This workshop will focus on survey data collection. We will discuss question bias: how word choice can influence respondents’ answers. We will identify bias and develop ways to avoid using bias in survey questions. Additionally, we will discuss how to determine which scale is appropriate for different question stems, and when open-ended questions are appropriate. Finally, participants will learn some features of Survey Monkey to create professional-looking surveys.


Teaching with iCE: Too Cool for School
The iCE (Interactive Curricula Experience) Platform & App, a locally-developed content management system, literally places the learning experience at the student’s fingertips. The platform encourages course developers to re-think the organization and presentation of learning materials based on how they wish the learner to engage with the course content. During the session, a sample module with related topics will be deconstructed for participants. Content developers will describe the organization of at least one topic from two perspectives—the pedagogical and the visual. Templates used to create individual topics will be shared with participants to make the design process transparent. The facilitator will describe best practices in course design and development throughout the workshop, including the importance of a consistency in creating and delivering content, the benefits of multiple kinds of learning objects, and the ability for learners to interact with course materials.

Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Describe three course design principles
  • Identify key characteristics of the iCE platform
  • Apply the iCE template to a topic


TEACHING & LEARNING:

    Not All Courses are Created Equal: Developing and Maintaining a Sense of Community in Fully Online Learning Environments
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 8/19/2016
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    One of the most prominent fears for faculty and students alike when teaching or taking a fully online course is the perceived lack of social presence in the absence of in-person interactions. Fully online courses that are designed with community-building tasks and activities have resulted in greater student and Facilitator satisfaction and perceived learning (eg., Garrison, Anderson & Archer, 2000; Richardson & Swan, 2003; Rovai, 2002; Rovai, Ponton & Baker, 2008). This workshop will include discussions and evidence-based materials that will help you think about online teaching and learning with a new lens.

    At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
    • Describe the perceived challenges of online courses and personal interactions
    • Describe methods for developing and fostering a sense of community and connection in a fully online course
    • Name some readily available tools for facilitating student-student and student-instructor interactions


    Building a Better Lecture
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 8/24/2016
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    According to classroom observations and self-report data, instructors rely heavily on lecture as an instructional method despite research documenting the limited effectiveness of lectures as a teaching strategy. Lectures can be integral to the learning experience with an understanding of the factors contributing to its effectiveness as an instructional tool. This workshop will focus on identifying key uses of lecture and three simple strategies for building more effective learning experiences for students. Participants are asked to identify and bring a lecture they have previously developed for use during the experiential workshop.

    Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be to:
    • Identify best uses of lecture
    • Define one organizing technique for lectures
    • Incorporate signposts into a planned lecture experience
    • Apply best practices to a planned lecture experience


    Universal Design (UD) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL): What Are They and How Do They Impact My Students?
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 8/31/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:30pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    UDL and UD are terms that are often used interchangeably but they are different in several ways. Universal Design for Learning is “a framework to improve and optimize teaching and learning for all people based on scientific insights into how humans learn” (Rose & Meyer, 1984). Universal Design refers to what we must do by law to ensure physical access to buildings and spaces for individuals with disabilities. This session will include discussions and information on UDL and UD and specific methods for implementing the principles of UDL in our teaching.

    At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
    • Differentiate between the terms Universal Design for Learning and Universal Design
    • Describe ways in which UD may be applicable in their classrooms, buildings or community
    • Describe several ways in which the principles of UDL may be applied in one or more of their courses


    Assessment Essentials
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 9/13/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    As health care professionals, each of us embraces the concept of assessment, so much so that Physical Assessment is often given its own course in a curriculum. This one-hour workshop may serve as a primer and/or a refresher on the most basic concepts in educational assessment.

    Topics include:
    • Formative vs. Summative Assessment
    • Bloom’s Taxonomy and performance domains
    • Reliability, Validity and Assessment Statistics
    • Policies and a Systematic Approach


    Teaching and Supporting International Students and Other ESL Learners
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; James  Dyksen, MSEd-TESOL
    Date: 9/20/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    International students and other students for whom English is a second language face a unique set of challenges and issues as they adjust to study in the degree programs at Jefferson, and, in many cases, to living in the US for the first time. This workshop will elicit faculty experiences teaching and working with ESL learners, including both concerns and effective strategies. The workshop is designed to develop awareness of the needs of international students and other ESL learners in Jefferson programs and classes, to discuss teaching, curriculum design and communication strategies that may help such students, and to identify resources across campus that may aid International and ESL learners with coursework and / or other areas of need.

    At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
    • Describe the unique needs of international students and other ESL learners
    • Develop strategies for addressing the needs or concerns of international students and other ESL learners
    • Apply these alternative strategies to the learning environment
    • Identify available campus resources to support international students and other ESL learners


    Electronic Portfolios for Academic Programs and Career Success
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Anthony J Frisby, PhD
    Date: 10/10/2016
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    The fields of art, architecture and engineering have long used portfolio’s as a way for both students – and professionals – to show case their work. Not unexpectedly, these physical portfolios have found their way onto the digital world and are often called e-portfolios. Whether physical or electronic this tool for show casing a person’s skills and experience is valuable. Both to the learner as evidence of their accomplishments and as a tool to help them stand out as a better candidate in the hiring process. Portfolios can also play an important role in the professional development of a student. Specific course projects that meet academic objectives can be reflected on, solidifying the students understanding of concepts and the skills they’ve mastered.

    Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
    • Identify how portfolios can be used in the academic program to track student progress and mastery of skills
    • Observe a demonstration of sample portfolios in Jefferson’s portfolio product, Portfoliu
    • Identify which assignments in your course would be appropriate for showcasing student achievement in a portfolio


    To Record or Not to Record: A Session on When, Why and How to Integrate Video Content
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 10/18/2016
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this workshop)

    Understanding the student benefits of instructor-recorded video content will be discussed. Equally as important is the understanding of when to do so – just because we can, doesn’t mean we should. During this session, we will also explore tools that are user-friendly and freely available for use in our courses.

    At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
    • Describe the benefits of instructor-recorded video content
    • Describe ways in which video content may be effectively integrated into their course
    • Identify several user-friendly and freely available video tools
    • Develop a plan for at least one instructor-recorded video for the current or future semester


    Just In Time Low-Stakes Formative Assessments: Tips and Strategies to Inform Instruction
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 11/1/2016
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    In this workshop, we will discuss and practice using evidence-based strategies for assessing student understanding of the content throughout the semester. This ‘just in time’ data provides ongoing feedback used by instructors to adjust their teaching to improve student outcomes. Formative assessments are also designed to help students identify their strengths and areas in need of more targeted work prior to taking high-stakes exams and other assessments. Formative assessments need not be time consuming to create or to deliver and analyze.

    At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
    • Understand the purposes of and differences between formative and summative assessments
    • Describe multiple formative assessment options for use in their courses
    • Create at least one formative assessment for immediate use in one or more courses


    Clinical Behavior: Evaluating a Student’s Professionalism
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 11/16/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    Many health care accreditation organizations require that programs not only foster professionalism, but also demonstrate that graduates possess these qualities. The evaluation of values, affect and communication skill is significantly more difficult than the evaluation of cognition or psychomotor skill. If evaluating professionalism troubles you, this one-hour workshop should being to ease your discomfort.

    Topics include:
    • Validity of Measurement in the Affective Domain
    • Strategies to Improve Reliability of Affective Domain Assessment Instruments
    • Formative and Summative Evaluations of Professionalism


    Assessing the Skillful (or not-so Skillful) Practitioner
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 11/29/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    The psychomotor domain is by far the most resource intensive of the three (cognitive, affective, psychomotor) domains to measure. This one-hour workshop will explore the difficulties associated with evaluating skill performance and strategies to overcome these obstacles.

    Topics include:
    • Validity of Measurement in the Psychomotor Domain
    • Skill Acquisition, Scaffolding and the Assessment Cycle
    • Strategies to Reliably Recognize the Skillful Practicioner


    Not All Courses are Created Equal: Developing and Maintaining a Sense of Community in Fully Online Learning Environments
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 1/6/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    One of the most prominent fears for faculty and students alike when teaching or taking a fully online course is the perceived lack of social presence in the absence of in-person interactions. Fully online courses that are designed with community-building tasks and activities have resulted in greater student and Facilitator satisfaction and perceived learning (eg., Garrison, Anderson & Archer, 2000; Richardson & Swan, 2003; Rovai, 2002; Rovai, Ponton & Baker, 2008). This workshop will include discussions and evidence-based materials that will help you think about online teaching and learning with a new lens.

    At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
    • Describe the perceived challenges of online courses and personal interactions
    • Describe methods for developing and fostering a sense of community and connection in a fully online course
    • Name some readily available tools for facilitating student-student and student-instructor interactions


    Teaching and Supporting International Students and Other ESL Learners
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; James  Dyksen, MSEd-TESOL
    Date: 1/18/2017
    Time: 11:00am – 12:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    International students and other students for whom English is a second language face a unique set of challenges and issues as they adjust to study in the degree programs at Jefferson, and, in many cases, to living in the US for the first time. This workshop will elicit faculty experiences teaching and working with ESL learners, including both concerns and effective strategies. The workshop is designed to develop awareness of the needs of international students and other ESL learners in Jefferson programs and classes, to discuss teaching, curriculum design and communication strategies that may help such students, and to identify resources across campus that may aid International and ESL learners with coursework and / or other areas of need.

    At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
    • Describe the unique needs of international students and other ESL learners
    • Develop strategies for addressing the needs or concerns of international students and other ESL learners
    • Apply these alternative strategies to the learning environment
    • Identify available campus resources to support international students and other ESL learners


    Building a Better Lecture
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 1/20/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    According to classroom observations and self-report data, instructors rely heavily on lecture as an instructional method despite research documenting the limited effectiveness of lectures as a teaching strategy. Lectures can be integral to the learning experience with an understanding of the factors contributing to its effectiveness as an instructional tool. This workshop will focus on identifying key uses of lecture and three simple strategies for building more effective learning experiences for students. Participants are asked to identify and bring a lecture they have previously developed for use during the experiential workshop.

    Upon completion of the workshop, participants will be to:
    • Identify best uses of lecture
    • Define one organizing technique for lectures
    • Incorporate signposts into a planned lecture experience
    • Apply best practices to a planned lecture experience


    Universal Design (UD) and Universal Design for Learning (UDL): What Are They and How Do They Impact My Students?
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 1/31/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:30am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    UDL and UD are terms that are often used interchangeably but they are different in several ways. Universal Design for Learning is “a framework to improve and optimize teaching and learning for all people based on scientific insights into how humans learn” (Rose & Meyer, 1984). Universal Design refers to what we must do by law to ensure physical access to buildings and spaces for individuals with disabilities. This session will include discussions and information on UDL and UD and specific methods for implementing the principles of UDL in our teaching.

    At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
    • Differentiate between the terms Universal Design for Learning and Universal Design
    • Describe ways in which UD may be applicable in their classrooms, buildings or community
    • Describe several ways in which the principles of UDL may be applied in one or more of their courses


    Active Teaching, Engaging Minds
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 2/3/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    Active teaching is an umbrella term used to identify a variety of teaching strategies. It includes most anything that students do in a classroom other than passively listening to an instructor’s lecture. Research demonstrates active learning improves students' understanding and retention of information and can be very effective in developing higher order cognitive skills such as problem solving and critical thinking. Active learning, however, presents challenges and requires re-thinking the classroom space and traditional roles.

    This interactive workshop will:
    • summarize the impact of active teaching on student learning
    • demonstrate a handful of active teaching strategies
    • discuss some challenges to adopting active teaching techniques


    Assessment Essentials
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 2/7/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    As health care professionals, each of us embraces the concept of assessment, so much so that Physical Assessment is often given its own course in a curriculum. This one-hour workshop may serve as a primer and/or a refresher on the most basic concepts in educational assessment.

    Topics include:
    • Formative vs. Summative Assessment
    • Bloom’s Taxonomy and performance domains
    • Reliability, Validity and Assessment Statistics
    • Policies and a Systematic Approach


    To Record or Not to Record: A Session on When, Why and How to Integrate Video Content
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 3/15/2017
    Time: 10:00am – 11:30am
    Location: Scott 307
    (Register for this workshop)

    Understanding the student benefits of instructor-recorded video content will be discussed. Equally as important is the understanding of when to do so – just because we can, doesn’t mean we should. During this session, we will also explore tools that are user-friendly and freely available for use in our courses.

    At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
    • Describe the benefits of instructor-recorded video content
    • Describe ways in which video content may be effectively integrated into their course
    • Identify several user-friendly and freely available video tools
    • Develop a plan for at least one instructor-recorded video for the current or future semester


    The Active Learning Lecture
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 3/20/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    The large lecture presents a number of challenges to experienced and novice instructors alike. This workshop explores some of the challenges (and assumptions we make about what can or cannot happen in a large lecture) and describes a number of techniques to assist faculty transition from the “sage on the stage” to a “guide on the side.”

    This interactive workshop will:
    • describe benefits and challenges associated with a traditional lecture model
    • explore instructor and student assumptions about large enrollment courses
    • identify potential engaged learning activities for the large lecture courses
    • demonstrate a handful of techniques to enhance large lecture courses


    Just In Time Low-Stakes Formative Assessments: Tips and Strategies to Inform Instruction
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Mary Gozza-Cohen, PhD
    Date: 3/28/2017
    Time: 1:00pm – 2:30pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    In this workshop, we will discuss and practice using evidence-based strategies for assessing student understanding of the content throughout the semester. This ‘just in time’ data provides ongoing feedback used by instructors to adjust their teaching to improve student outcomes. Formative assessments are also designed to help students identify their strengths and areas in need of more targeted work prior to taking high-stakes exams and other assessments. Formative assessments need not be time consuming to create or to deliver and analyze.

    At the end of this session, participants will be able to:
    • Understand the purposes of and differences between formative and summative assessments
    • Describe multiple formative assessment options for use in their courses
    • Create at least one formative assessment for immediate use in one or more courses


    Clinical Behavior: Evaluating a Student’s Professionalism
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 4/5/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    Many health care accreditation organizations require that programs not only foster professionalism, but also demonstrate that graduates possess these qualities. The evaluation of values, affect and communication skill is significantly more difficult than the evaluation of cognition or psychomotor skill. If evaluating professionalism troubles you, this one-hour workshop should being to ease your discomfort.

    Topics include:
    • Validity of Measurement in the Affective Domain
    • Strategies to Improve Reliability of Affective Domain Assessment Instruments
    • Formative and Summative Evaluations of Professionalism


    Electronic Portfolios for Academic Programs and Career Success
    Instructor: Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 4/28/2017
    Time: 9:00am – 10:00am
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    The fields of art, architecture and engineering have long used portfolio’s as a way for both students – and professionals – to show case their work. Not unexpectedly, these physical portfolios have found their way onto the digital world and are often called e-portfolios. Whether physical or electronic this tool for show casing a person’s skills and experience is valuable. Both to the learner as evidence of their accomplishments and as a tool to help them stand out as a better candidate in the hiring process. Portfolios can also play an important role in the professional development of a student. Specific course projects that meet academic objectives can be reflected on, solidifying the students understanding of concepts and the skills they’ve mastered.

    Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
    • Identify how portfolios can be used in the academic program to track student progress and mastery of skills
    • Observe a demonstration of sample portfolios in Jefferson’s portfolio product, Portfoliu
    • Identify which assignments in your course would be appropriate for showcasing student achievement in a portfolio


    Assessing the Skillful (or not-so Skillful) Practitioner
    Instructors: Julie Phillips, PhD; Kathleen Day, MS
    Date: 5/2/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    The psychomotor domain is by far the most resource intensive of the three (cognitive, affective, psychomotor) domains to measure. This one-hour workshop will explore the difficulties associated with evaluating skill performance and strategies to overcome these obstacles.

    Topics include:
    • Validity of Measurement in the Psychomotor Domain
    • Skill Acquisition, Scaffolding and the Assessment Cycle
    • Strategies to Reliably Recognize the Skillful Practicioner



WRITING FOR PUBLICATION:

    Key Steps in Writing--and Publishing--Your Manuscript
    Instructor: Jennifer Wilson, MS
    Date: 11/22/2016
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    This presentation provides advice on how to be more organized and less overwhelmed when you write your next manuscript. It also focuses on key elements of manuscript writing, with a focus on engaging an editor’s attention.

    Upon completion of this session, participants will:
    • Know the key points to keep in mind when starting their next manuscript
    • Know what parts of the manuscript readers are most likely to see, and how to improve them
    • Know how to use a systematic approach to writing the body of the paper

    Embracing Glossophobia: Learning to Communicate with Confidence
    Instructors: Jennifer Wilson, MS; Julie Phillips, PhD
    Date: 2/10/2017
    Time: 3:00pm – 4:30pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    Perhaps no tool in the professional toolbox has been as feared as public speaking. However, professional advancement is often tied to one’s ability to successfully present information at a meeting, a professional conference or even within the classroom.
    To excel in a professional context, you must be able to communicate in a number of different contexts and with a wide number of audiences. This interactive session provides a framework for re-thinking personal communication habits and techniques to assist you with your next communication interaction.

    Upon completion of this workshop, participants will be able to:
    • Define communication apprehension
    • Describe the four common contexts for communication
    • Recognize potential triggers for communication anxiety
    • Identify at least one stress reduction technique for communication interactions


    5 Habits Of Successful Writers — and Ways To Foster Them In Your Own Writing
    Instructor: Jennifer Wilson, MS
    Date: 3/23/2017
    Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm
    Location: Scott 200A
    (Register for this workshop)

    Few of us ever learn how to write with consistency and fluency, and yet being able to do so can mean the difference between being a highly regarded researcher and one who is overlooked. Studies have shown that successful writers practice specific habits that help them flourish and make the process of writing less mysterious. This workshop will focus on these habits and provide practical advice for fostering them in your own writing.

    Upon completion of this session, participants will:
    • Know 5 habits of successful writers
    • Understand how they improve the writing process
    • Learn practical ways to integrate these habits to achieve their own writing goals



ONLINE TUTORIALS:

Evidence-Based Medicine Tutorial
Learn how to get to the heart of an article, determine if it's useful and apply it to patient care.

Copyright & Fair Use Guidelines
This workshop will provide basic information about copyright and guidelines for classroom use of published materials. Fair use doctrine and its application in a university setting will also be addressed.